Now I need a tripodison

Updated on June 22, 2021 in General Stuff
10 on June 20, 2021

[This may be a duplicate, and I’ll delete it if it is and if I can]

Since I have an early  Romantic guitar being finished in Spain now, and since I will soon have my tailor create a period costume (suit) to perform my 19th century music on, I may as well get a tripodison to complete my descent into madness.

There is a modern version  of  the tripodison (guitar stand) that looks like this:

https://musictales.club/article/dionisio-aguados-guitar-method-and-tripodison-guitar-stand-have-been-use-200-years.

Dionisio Aguado played on one, this to keep the guitar away from the body to allow for greater resonance (did it work?  I don’t know), and his looked like this:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/Sj4C7BJcukG-2SJCLoK3gHApjZT-dkS2698BFu5jD0BA3ZCGDhIxSvXuL_wLVsJywFdZemwLSoSpCRqycjuRccjKGlRWd4JcH6bQt7oWGkJkrw 

It’s obviously more elegant than the modern monstrosity above, as was everything else in the 19th century, except for P.O.W. camps and slaughterhouses.  I cannot understand why none have survived, or if they have, I can’t find them.  who would destroy one?  The heirs of 

There is even a detailed schematic for this thing in Aguado’s Method book.  I can’t put my hands on it at the moment, but the tube above the feet is made of wood.  Inside the tube is a telescoping dowel, secured with a  butterfly valve, made of wood or metal, and that dowel connect somehow to the cradle (my word) the the guitar sits on.  I am going to try to fabricate one when my guitar gets here. I guess I don’t need to wait ….

 

 
  • Liked by
Reply
0 on June 20, 2021

Apparently I’m not the first to consider a replica. It looks like a tool you’d find in Dr. Frankenstein’s laboratory.

 

  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel
0 on June 20, 2021

Here’s the contemporary version:

  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel
1 on June 20, 2021

I learned a new word today.

on June 20, 2021

Sid, thanks for that video. Those modern devices appear designed primarily to avoid the need for a footstool. Wasn’t there something similar a few years back that was made of foam rubber and covered with black cloth? Aguado’s contraption supposedly was intended to allow the guitar to resonate more loudly. Sor said he like it, but I don’t think he used one. There are sketches of him with a strap, which I am also considering for when I stroll the back alleys of Barcelona playing my Lacôte for adoring señoritas gazing down from their wrought iron balconies.

“Graciela, come away from that window and return to your studies at once.”

“But Papa, I LOVE him!”

That could happen.

But I wonder if Sor was just giving props to his compatriot Aguado out of respect and kindness. Who needs a duel?

Do you buy the notion that eliminating or reducing contact with the body allows for more vibration and more volume? I’ll watch the video again, but I don’t think the said that increased volume was a selling point.

Show more replies
  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel
0 on June 20, 2021

Sid, here is an image of the one I tried to to link to above. It accomplishes Aguado’s objective but it’s pretty unsightly.

  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel
0 on June 21, 2021

Rob, it just so happens that I have evidence that these things do increase the resonance and volume of the guitars they are attached to—at least, if they are traditionally built with active backs and sides (as opposed, to say a Smallman or similar “Australian” build, with the arched laminate backs).

Back before the bean counters picked everything to death, I used to teach a 3-credit guitar pedagogy class. The text I used (Glise) discusses positioning the guitar in some detail—including historical.

When the subject of Sor using a table came up, I had each class try it out. There is no doubt that the guitars were louder and more robust sounding without a 150-250lb wet bag of meat (person) pressing up against the back, soaking up a chunk of the good vibes.

The largest of those plexiglass guitar lifts isolates the body from the back of the guitar as well; I use one, and it increases the resonance of all 4 guitars I’ve tried it on. Pretty cool.

  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel
0 on June 22, 2021

Sid, I am very interested in these things, but I’m pretty comfortable with a footstool. I almost wonder what I’d do with my left leg if it were suddenly freed from a stool. At 68, old habits die hard.

The other thing is that I am currently only dampening about 6 inches with the left leg and 3 on the right leg where the legs contact the lower bout. The back of the guitar does not touch my chest or stomach, unless I exhale — kidding — and the top of the upper bout sort of leans against my chest, but just barely, and I doubt there is much deadening from these contact points. I was half joking about wanting a rest, because I assume the LaCôte will call for adjustment to my current practice, and anyway Aguado used one, and who am I to argue? (More below on that.)

Are you always using one, even for practicing, or just for performing? And did you get one to get all the volume you can, or primarily for comfort?

I wish I could post his discussion about “mounting” (a faulty and unfortunate translation of the Spanish “montar”) the tripodison. It’s hilariously detailed, but it’s a pdf file and I don’t know how to copy an extract of a 150 page pdf. There were apparently holes drilled into the bottom of his guitars and the holes fit over these spikes or pegs that projected up from the tripod, all to “mount” and to steady the guitar on the tripod. Horrors. I thought he just gingerly rested against that curved band. 😐

  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel
0 on June 22, 2021

That mounting thing sounds horrible!

I use it all the time.  Let’s see if I can get last Friday’s fundraiser gig for Catholic Charities to attach…

  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel
0 on June 22, 2021

Wow! Up on the 10th fret, too, easy as pie, with mountains in the background. Great scene and photo.

Anyway, I see the lift there. Looks good. The feet planted squarely on the ground like that makes you look so well balanced, which surely contributes to … something.

I thought you had parted with your early romantic guitars, though(?) Did your friction pegs cooperate? I think my Lacôte will be considerably smaller.

What were you playing there?

  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel
0 on June 22, 2021

I have to confess, I have no idea what I was playing when the event photog got around to capturing me. 

I love those little guitars: super-easy to play, loud, bold in a way that makes them more familiar sounding to today’s steel-string influenced listeners. I’ll always have at least one lying around. The pegs on that one are the “pegheds” friction pegs with the mini 4:1 internal gear inside. They push in and out to adjust the friction just like a straight wooden peg, but you get just enough ratio to be easy to tune—pretty much the same ration as banjo tuners. Very cool.

Aside from that fact that it was raining out and high 50s/low60s, I was indeed comfortable. Cold, but balanced.

🙂

  • Liked by
Reply
Cancel