In the good and hard category: Portland police resignations/laterals

Updated on December 23, 2020 in General Stuff
4 on December 23, 2020

As predicted.

https://www.koin.com/news/civic-affairs/citing-hostility-portland-police-leaving-mid-career/

Stevie Wonder could have seen this coming. This will continue, past the level of 911 service outages, before some of these cities figure out what they did to themselves over the last 6 months.

 
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0 on December 23, 2020

I can’t imagine the appeal of serving in law enforcement in Portland, so God bless the young people who are stepping up; it looks like there are a few.

Those resigning should apply in East Texas, where Blue Lives Matter signs festoon the front yards and truck bumpers .

I have to suspect that there will be a slow slide back to the center in Portland as a Thermidorean Reaction takes hold. Until then, private armed militias will quietly form, naming themselves Neighborhood Watch associations and oiling their guns.

And as they do form, I would advise rioters to watch their backs.

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0 on December 23, 2020

When Portland circa 2050 comes to resemble Detroit circa 2010, no lessons will be learned.

Instead, the unquestionable and unfalsifiable narrative will be something like “Trump’s racism is to blame”.

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0 on December 23, 2020

Rob makes a valid point: the very dawn of modern policing had as much to do with protecting offenders from mob justice as the population from offenders.

Several police trainers and court certified subject matter experts on use of force have publicly predicted #1, the flight of the best officers from urban centers to rural departments, #2, major staffing shortages in urban centers, #3 the increase in hiring of under-qualified and poorly-trained replacements in an effort to make up the difference, and #4, the rise of private security contractors, employing highly trained personnel at market prices for the corporations and collectives of people (eg. gated communities) that can afford the considerable tab.

The middle class will be on their own to some extent and, as well, the very populations of urban poor that the whole narrative-driven policy shift is ostensibly meant to help will be the communities hardest hit by increased lawlessness. History is not on the side of the geniuses populating many (though not all) city councils.

During the entire “defund the police” wave, with the hundreds of concomitant stories in the media—large and small— you know who I’ve *never* seen interviewed? A vetted, career police trainer or court-certified subject matter expert.

It’s every bit as absurd as running a year’s worth of 24-7 pandemic news cycle without ever interviewing an infectious disease specialist, or epidemiologist, but here we are, nevertheless.

#collectingmarshmallowsfortheworldburn

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0 on December 23, 2020
employing highly trained personnel at market prices for the corporations and collectives of people (eg. gated communities) that can afford the considerable tab.From Sidhedude

This is my good friend Dan Clark. Formerly of the Omaha Police Department, he had a chance encounter with one of Warren Buffett’s (adult) children long ago and ended up as Buffett’s personal bodyguard. He makes big bux from that gig. If you see a photo of Buffett in a public place, odds are you’ll see Dan Clark standing behind him.

Dan is a certified BAMF. A martial arts expert, of course, but his flavor is something of a “martial arts plus meanness“. He’s not about scoring points. He’s about disabling you. Quickly and efficiently. Many times he’d say something like “Now we really have to be careful training on this move, since we’re only a few degrees of rotation away from permanent injury”.

I trained with him for a number of years. Our classes generally started with 20 or 30 minutes of open sparring, and getting paired up with Dan was terrifying. He knew that exact moment when he would catch you feeling good about yourself. He punished you for having that thought.

The greatest compliment I ever got came, second hand anyway, from him. After I had to stop training (hip went to shit and really needs to be replaced, but I’m putting it off), a mutual friend told me Dan told him “Too bad Jeff had to quit. He was a tough guy”.

Yeah, I’m bragging.

 

 

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