Graham Hancock

Updated on December 12, 2020 in General Stuff
9 on December 11, 2020

He’s probably a bit nutty, but he is always interesting.

 
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0 on December 11, 2020

Very interesting. Thanks.

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0 on December 11, 2020

“Atlantis ceased to wear its prosperity with moderation.”

Boom!

Archeology and paleontology are fascinating to me. My general sense is that researchers are forced to work with rare and tiny fragments of information (a bone here, a bone there), and then weave that record into a coherent story.

For good reasons, they seek to weave the simplest possible story that will fit into the evidence record. That makes sense.

That means that the story is always going to be exactly as incomplete as the record. And we know that the record is profoundly scarce. So the story is too.

Hancock etal push just a bit beyond that, and imagine a more complete (and more interesting) story.

We know that anatomically and intellectually modern humans have been around for something like 150k years. Probably longer.

Hancock’s single insight is rejecting the idea that modern humans spent 145k years as hunter-gatherers, then suddenly invented agriculture and everything that came from that.

What if advanced civilizations have come and gone numerous times? Crazy as it sounds, that’s not impossible.

If every human on earth vanished today, what evidence of our presence would exist in 50k years? Maybe Mt Rushmore? Maybe a few spots (abandoned nuclear plants) with slightly higher than background radiation levels and some odd isotopes? Maybe the presence of some peculiar long-chain hydrocarbon molecules (plastics) in landfills?

Ashes to ashes. Dust to dust.

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0 on December 12, 2020

Whoa.  I feel strangely compelled to concur.

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4 on December 12, 2020

We keep a lot of dried beans and rice, so I so I could last a bit longer than 3 days. Assuming the asteroid doesn’t affect the power grid and prevent me from cooking them. It wouldn’t that, would it?🙁

I have some briquettes and lighter fluid. I think I need some firewood. A lot of it. And some more bottled water. And a storm shelter. And lots of those ketchup packets.

But I imagine that there are still lots of underground bunkers from the days of the cold War, filled with water, dried beef, vitamins and information and gizmos like iPhone helicopters and guns, and the select few who get to go in will emerge from the wreckage and be able to tell our story.

Only problem is they may have to stay down there for 10,000 years.

on December 12, 2020

Is there an edit function to correct my inevitable typos?

on December 12, 2020

I saw a pencil thing to edit in another thread. Now I don’t see it.

on December 12, 2020

We keep a lot of dried beans and rice, so I could last a bit longer than 3 days. Assuming the asteroid doesn’t affect the power grid and prevent me from cooking them. It wouldn’t do that, would it?🙁

I have some briquettes and lighter fluid. I think I need some firewood. A lot of it. And some more bottled water. And a storm shelter. And lots of those ketchup packets.

But I imagine that there are still lots of underground bunkers from the days of the cold War, filled with water, dried beef, vitamins and information and gizmos like iPhone helicopters and guns, and the select few who get to go in will emerge from the wreckage and be able to tell our story.

Only problem is they may have to stay down there for 10,000 years.

From robjh22

on December 12, 2020

Sorry, I tried to edit and just made a duplicate and can’t delete it!

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0 on December 12, 2020

LOL! We’re all still learning the ropes around here!

My general sense if things in this regard is that while each of us has the ability in some respects to optimize our individual positions, in the big picture, those efforts are mostly futile.

Which is to say, we can do things to acquire better deck chairs, but whether the ship sinks or floats is largely a function of things beyond our control.

Randal Carlson is something of a fellow traveler to Graham Hancock. His milieu is geology, mostly. Like Hancock, he has a certain nuttiness to him. But he also talks about how we can find clues about the past in ancient stories. That fascinates me. What if what we call “myths” are actually stories propagated through oral tradition over 100k years?

The idea of a 100k year old story evokes an almost numinoustic response in me.

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