Global First

Updated on September 7, 2021 in General Stuff
3 on September 2, 2021

I can’t be the only one to think this…

It popped into my head today that we are living through the first global mass-hysteria in history.

That seems…dangerous.

I wonder how it ends. How do you unwind people from this?

My fear is that so many are convinced something awful is going to happen, they will will their horror into existence.

 
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0 on September 3, 2021

I can’t help but see it as the inevitable consequence of the debasement and marginalization of classical Christianity. Not Holy Rollerdom or other fringe movements post-Schism, but straight up Judeo/Catholic/Anglican/Christianity.

And with that debasement, you’ve driven out courage. Real courage, not the “Taliban” style courage that stones a woman to death for disobeying God’s word, but sacrificial courage of giving your life for another.

That leaves death as the worst thing that can happen to you. And death is everywhere you look once you take any possibility of anything worse than death away.

Yeah, it does seem dangerous. Let’s pray there are still some cowboys left.

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0 on September 3, 2021

I saw an interesting video the other day. This guy does a breakdown on the song “Spirit in the Sky”:

https://youtu.be/Ac5c1Ns-Bng

It’s an interesting video, with lots of cool stuff, but the thing that struck me was that the song was written by a Jewish guy who didn’t really have any training or education in Christianity.

Which gets to the lyric “Never been a sinner. I never sin. Gotta have a friend in Jesus”.

I remember even as a kid raising an eyebrow at that. Made me wonder what sort of Jesus people wrote the song. The Jesus people I knew didn’t talk like that. Quite the opposite, really. The version I would have written, based on what I was taught, would have been something like “I’m always a sinner. I always sin. That’s why I need a friend in Jesus”.

What struck me from that video was that Norman Greenbaum’s version (“I never sin”) is a reflection of what the popular culture told him Christianity was all about.

So I wonder how that happened. How is it that a religion that absolutely believes “We are all imperfect. We all sin. We aren’t worth of redemption. But Jesus died for our sins anyway. Such is the measure of God’s infinite love” came to be thought of as saying “Never been a sinner. I never sin” by a casual observer in 1970?

I don’t know the answer, but the fact that the popular version is so perfectly opposite of reality suggests something.

Part of it, surely, is the “church lady” stereotype. And that stereotype exists for a reason. There are absolutely some people who believe themselves to be superior to others because of their faith.

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0 on September 7, 2021

I think it has a lot to do with the assumption that God’s looking for perfection in an inherently imperfect world. He’s created a world that depends on his forgiveness, and He knows it. It’s not so much, “Here’s the obscure rules, buried in a book that makes no damn rational sense to any of you all (how could it with as far behind the eight ball as you all are?”).

It’s more of, “Here’s the rules. You won’t get it. You can’t suceed perfectly. What’s important is that you try. You know, the whole ‘the greatest of these is love’ thing. Keep that front and center. The Book is full of merely helpful suggestions. When push comes to shove, you’ll likely shit yourself. That’s alright. Stand strong and know I’m cheering for you. I’ll be here when you’re done and we’ll chat. Stay strong and fight for the weakest among you, whatever that ends up meaning. Good luck, and don’t be too hard on yourself.”

And the ultimate answer when you meet your maker is, “I tried.”

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